Wasgamuwa National Safari Park



Approximate time to travel to Wasgomuwa National Park from The Riverston Grand is about 75 minutes or one hour and fifteen minutes at a distance of 48km.The road is carpeted from Laggala onwards and the other part is being carpeted at the moment which when completed will take about 45 minutes from the resort to the park entrance on a direct journey. This beautiful wild life sanctuary homes a range of wild animals as described in below paragraphs including well built elephants that are not often seen in the other parks. One such photograph is displayed in the resort which was photographed by the young wild life photographer Ansala Boteju. Ideal times to start the safari from the park is morning 6.00am or afternoon 3.00pm. This park borders the Mahaweli river and the visitors can go for a pleasant river bath before or after starting the safari.

Wasgamuwa National Park is a natural park in Sri Lanka situated in the Matale and Polonnaruwa Districts . It was declared to protect and to make a refuge for the displaced wild animals during the Mahaweli Development Project in 1984 and is one of the four National Parks designated under the Project. Originally it was designated as a nature reserve in 1938, and then in the early 1970s the area was regraded as a strict nature reserve. W asgamuwa is one of protected areas where Sri Lankan Elephants can be seen in large herds. It is also one of the Important Bird Areas in Sri Lanka. The name of the Wasgamuwa has derived through the words "Walas Gamuwa". "Walasa" is Sinhala for sloth bear and "Gamuwa" means a wood. This park has an area called “Yudangana Pitiya” a grassland which is believed that the final war of great king Dutugamunu and king Elara took place. This grassland area is a must see as one can see a special type of rock clusters in places and folk tales say these could have been used in the war.

Physical features of Wasgamuwa:
The National Park's annual daily temperature is 28 °C (82 °F) and has a dry zone climate. Highest elevation of the National Park is Sudu Kanda (White mountain), which is 470 metres (1,540 ft) of height. The soil of the national park contains quartz and marble. The forests of Wasgamuwa represent Sri Lanka dry evergreen forests. The park consists of primary, secondary, riverine forests and grasslands.

History and historic irrigation of Wasgamuwa:
Ruins of Malagamuwa, Wilmitiya, Dasthota irrigation tanks and Kalinga Yoda Ela canal which are built by Parākramabāhu I remain in the national park.In the past water was irrigated from the Minipe anicut's left bank canal to Parakrama Samudra by Amban ganga which had run through Wasgamuwa. Yudangana Pitiya has identified as the battleground of the battle between King Ellalan and King Dutthagamani taken place. A grassland that the Dutthagamani's army supposed to have camped before the battle is known as Kandauru Pitiya. The ruins of Chulangani chaitya which is built by King Mahanaga can be seen in the national park. Its circumference, 966 feet (294 m) is greater than the Ruwanwelisaya's. The artifacts that have been recovered from the bricks of the chaitya include a bowl used by King Sri Vikrama Rajasinha and several bronze statues are now kept in the Yudangana vihara.Flora:Wasgamuwa National Park exhibits one of the highest biodiversity among the protected areas in Sri Lanka. More than 150 floral species have recorded from the park. Cryptocoryne walkeri and Munronia pumila are two plants with economic value. Reservoirs and riverine forests support large number of fauna species. The forest consists of several layers of frost cover. Some 1,700 years old tamarind tree, "Oru Bendi Siyambalawa" (Sinhala for Canoes-Moored-Tamarind) was situated in the park. Fauna: A peafowl enjoying the morning sun, Wasgamuwa National Park is home to 23 species of mammals. The park is inhabited by a herd of 150 Sri Lankan elephants. Marsh elephant (Elephas maximus vil-aliya) roams in the Mahaweli river area. Both monkeys found in the park, purple-faced langur and toque macaque, are endemic to Sri Lanka. While water buffalo and Sri Lankan axis deer are common to observe, Sri Lanka leopard and sloth bear are rare. Small golden palm civet is another rare endemic mammal. The number of bird species recorded from the park is 143.This includes 8 endemic species. Endemic red-faced malkoha is a resident bird in this national park. Sri Lanka junglefowl is another endemic bird inhabits the park. Lesser adjutant, yellow-fronted barbet, and Sri Lanka spurfowl are the species that visit the reservoirs and streams of the national park. Peafowl, painted stork, black-headed ibis and Eurasian spoonbill are the park's other aquatic birds. Rare Sri Lanka frogmouth can be found here. Another rare species, chestnut-winged cuckoo, is seen near the Mahaweli river.

Endemic and endangered Fejervarya pulla is one of the eight species of amphibians of the park. Of 17 reptile species recorded in the park, five species are endemic. Water monitor and mugger crocodile are common in the waterbodies of the park. Skinks Lankascincus spp., lizards Calotes ceylonensis and Otocryptis wiegmanni, and serpent Chrysopelea taprobanica are the endangered reptile species. Endemic Garra ceylonensis and combtail are among the 17 fish species reside in the aquatic habitats of the park. Of the park's 50 butterflies, eight species are endemic.

An elephant transit home is being proposed in the Wasgamuwa National Park. So enjoy your excursion from the resort to this wonderful wild life sanctuary and do not leave anything inside the park except your foot prints and blessings.



Book a Forest Department Registered Guide(Trekker) for a detailed tour of your excursion. Tour Vehicles and Safari Jeeps arranged on request.

Make a reservation online